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The Official Page of The Fashion Law.

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    Hot on the heels of the debut of Givenchy's Fall 2013 ad campaign, Riccardo Tisci unveiled the design house's Pre-Spring men's collection. Much like the Fall womenswear collection, this one is complete with florals, flames, and camouflage motifs (and mixes thereof), as well as those much talked-about bricolage Bambi tees. Also in the mix: classic Givenchy sharp tailoring and sporty Bermuda shorts paired with leggings. Pre-Fall's "Pervert 17" shirt has been replaced with one that reads "Favelas 74" (1974 is Tisci’s birth year), a clear indication of Tisci's Latin inspiration.















    images courtesy of style.com

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    Raf Simons is settling into his role as creative director at Christian Dior, as demonstrated by the Paris-based design house's Resort 2014 collection - Simons' first for Dior. In a fashion show set in Monaco earlier this month, Simons went out on a limb of sorts, showing elements that aren't exactly his speciality. Think: loose constructions and an abundance of lace, to which Simons said: "I wanted to bring a new materialization and work with fabrics that I am not used to." Also in effect: broad foil panels, acid green inserts, bold prints, jacquard lace crop tops, fluid jackets, and a myriad of sleeveless silk frocks, which were layered over lamé bra tops. Far from the circus-like spectacle of Givenchy's Fall 2013 front row, Simons' show drew quite a crowd none-the-less. Prince Albert and Princess Charlene of Monaco were in attendance, accompanied by Prince Albert’s nephew, Andrea Casiraghi, and his fiancée, Tatiana Santo Domingo, as were Marion Cotillard, Jessica Biel, Liv Tyler, Ruth Wilson and Ana Girardot. See the entire collection below ... 





























    images courtesy of style.com

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  • 05/27/13--10:00: Model Mondays: Robin Clive

  • Paris-based actor-turned-model, Robin Clive, just signed on with Rock Men models and has appeared in ad campaigns for Romain Laurent and Microsoft, and graced the pages of Wad Magazine and Intersection mag. He's set to walk in fashion week next month, but before that, he talks to us about studying, Givenchy, summer in Paris, and more ...

    The Fashion Law – How old are you and what's your nationality?

    Robin Clive – I'm 20 years old. I was born in Paris, lived in London for a few years and then came back to Paris. My mom is Canadian,  and my dad's family is Jewish from Poland. I will not start talking about my grandparents because it's actually a big melting pot! 

    The Fashion Law – Business today is so much about branding. Do you feel like models are brands?

    Robin Clive – I think models are a source of observation for the client, and so, a model is not necessarily a brand of his own. He is part of a designer's brand. 

    The Fashion Law – How do you think you are different from other models?

    Robin Clive – Most models are similar and I know that there will always be more beautiful models, but what makes me different is just being myself. My personality and who I am, aside from my looks.


    The Fashion Law – What did you think of modeling before you got started?

    Robin Clive – Before I started modeling, it wasn't a big interest for me because I was focused on acting. My dearest friend Willy Cartier showed me as he was getting started how fancy this job could be. Finally I started finding it pretty amusing because for me it is just playing another role. 

    The Fashion Law – What has been the highlight of modeling for you so far? Is there a specific job you loved?

    Robin Clive – I've enjoyed many of the jobs so far. I know that each time people are happy with the result, no matter what job it is, and so, I take pride in that. 

    The Fashion Law – Do you think there are any downsides to modeling?

    Robin Clive – Modeling is just like any other job, and so, there are good things and bad things, and like any other thing, I try to make the best out of it. 

    The Fashion Law – Is there a particular designer or design house that you absolutely want to work with?

    Robin Clive – Givenchy. Their shows are wonderful and always surprising. 

    images courtesy of rockmen

    The Fashion Law – What do you like to do when you're not traveling and working?

    Robin Clive – When I'm not working on shoots, I continue to work on my acting. I also write a lot, play guitar, and for the past two years, I've been studying "global design" in a school in Paris.

    The Fashion Law – Where do you see yourself in the next several years?

    Robin Clive – We'll see!

    The Fashion Law – What are you obsessed with right now?

    Robin Clive – Summer coming to Paris, because it means having a good time, good jobs, smiles on people's faces, long and colorful days, and mini skirts!

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    It's been a little while since we've heard any legal news on footwear designer to the stars, Christian Louboutin, following the infamous court battle with Yves St. Laurent, but the wait is over. Paris-based Christian Louboutin S.A.S. filed suit last week in the Southern District of New York against Alba Footwear, Easy Pickins, Inc., and Alan H. Warshak, stemming from the sale of red-soled shoes. Harley Lewin, Louboutin's counsel from the YSL case, filed a trademark infringement suit on behalf of the footwear designer, alleging that the defendants manufactured and sold counterfeit versions of Louboutin's products bearing its red sole trademark. This is one of the first lawsuits following the September 2012 ruling that Louboutin's red sole is, in fact, a valid trademark. Louboutin is asking for $2 million in damages, injunctive relief and additional damages. 


    Louboutin's Lady Spiked Leopard-Print Pump (left) & Alba's version (right)


    It is worth briefly mentioning that this is a trademark infringement case, as opposed to a copyright infringement case. While Alba's styles, one of which is oh-so-interestingly named "Christian," are near replicas of Louboutin styles, that similarity is not at issue. Because the overall design/appearance of Louboutin's shoes is not protected by copyright law (or any other law) in the U.S., the designer's lawsuit is exclusively limited to the replication of the red sole. As such, if Alba has recreated the Louboutin Lady Spiked Leopard-Print Pump, much like it did above, but without the red sole, this would be perfectly legal. 

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  • 05/28/13--08:00: Some Thoughts From Wil Fry
  • Streetwear fans have been buzzing these past couple of weeks about the limited time opening of "artist" Wil Fry's online shop that has since come and gone. However, for a bit of an unconventional Some Thoughts From post, here are some thoughts from internet sensation, Wil Fry. Please feel free to comment below (and just because we are posting this piece does not mean we are endorsing what may be copyright infringement). 



    On being copied: "It's all part of the game right? It does have its annoying moments, because there are kids spending $300 thinking they're buying a Wil Fry collaboration jersey with Givenchy off some dodgy website."

    On his Givenchy Nets jersey: "Since moving to America in 2010, one thing I'm constantly seeing is this quick shift from when something goes from being relatively unknown to popular to hyper-saturated in the market place. The Birds of Paradise print quickly became the most recognisable T-shirt print last year within high fashion, menswear, and streetwear. Initially, I was poking fun at how popular it had become, by suggesting the Brooklyn Nets were about to use it on their (yet to be unveiled) uniforms."

    On trademark infringement: "Re-appropriating brand imagery from the likes of Chanel or Louis Vuitton, for instance, in most cases is only going to strengthen their identity in the long run. These are companies with legacies older than the people who are trying to re-use their logo on a sweater."

    On his limited edition wares: "Generally, things are limited because I've just been paying for this out of whatever spare money I have. Also, I don't really want too many people wearing the stuff I make."

    On his future in fashion: "I've been approached by a few high-profile boutiques from various parts of the globe. I've thought about doing a line, perhaps in the future. If I have the resources and time to design a collection, I'd like to. I'm just fairly reluctant."

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    Many months ago, we were at an event where a strange box, now known to us as a MakerBot, produced a blue bracelet out of what is called filament. Yes, the bracelet was ugly and is not something we’d ever wear, but the concept was quite amazing. In a relatively short amount of time, this printer can communicate with your computer and create a model or real world product literally from the ground up. Fast-forward to present day and peoples’ imaginations have already taken 3D printing to unforeseen places (like working guns). 

    3D printed shoes - image courtesy of forbes

    One such place is fashion. Dutch designer Iris van Herpen used 3D printing to create two 3D-printed ensembles in her Voltage collection and the technology is being used in the designer eyewear market to create prototypes. Antonio Miyakawa, executive vice president of marketing, creative direction and product at Luxottica (the company that makes just about every brand of sunglasses on earth), told Business of Fashion, “Luxottica uses 3D printing technologies to speed up the process of product development in the prototyping phase.” Luxottica, by the way, has eyewear licenses with luxury brands like Chanel, Prada, Armani and Ralph Lauren, and also owns Ray-Ban, Oakley and Oliver Peoples. 

    3D printed looks from Iris van Herpen - images courtesy of dezeen

    So, it seems as though technology has once again had a meaningful impact on fashion. But, as we’ve seen before, this is not always a good thing. An example: The Internet means instant access to a designer’s collection, even for the majority of us who aren’t able to experience the show in-person. And while this provides those who truly adore fashion the opportunity to behold the beauty of, let’s say, the Balenciaga Spring 2010 RTW collection right when it happens, it also gives fast fashion retailers an early start on the next line of terrible copies. 

    And, like the instant access given by the Internet, there is sure to be a downside to 3D printers in fashion, especially in the eyewear market. Those who dabble in intellectual property infringement and counterfeiting, whether it’s as a seller or a buyer, are the type of people who will appreciate the lower price of a 3D printed replica, no matter what the cost to designers. If all it takes is some direction to a computer on what pair is being copied, a few hours (maybe faster as the technology improves), and the materials necessary to print the glasses, what’s to stop counterfeiters? Our answer is, for the moment, quite bleak: not much. The closest thing to hope right now is an experiment at Virginia Tech University, which hopes to embed dots into 3D printed materials to help prevent counterfeiting. 

    As is often the case, the benefits of technology may be negated or even outweighed by the costs, especially when it comes to fashion. And unfortunately, intellectual property laws aren’t nearly quick enough to keep up or offer the needed protection. 

    Jennifer Williams is a law student, who writes about fashion, the legal avenues available for protecting it, and the ways in which the laws are falling short. Jennifer writes for legal reporting blog, Legal As She Is Spoke. For more from Jennifer, visit her blog, StartFashionPause, or follow her on Twitter.

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  • 05/28/13--12:00: Damien Hirst v. Damien Hirst
  • Doing some research for a piece this week, I came across the Twitter account for artist Damien Hirst. But it was not the British artist and Young British Artists member (pictured below), who is known for his artwork, which often incorporates skulls, preserved animals and/or spin paintings. It was the account for the "Slovenian Damien Hirst" (hereinafter, "Slovenian Hirst"). Apparently, in 2009 some Slovenian artist decided to adopt the name, Damien Hirst, and start using it as his own. This Slovenian Hirst explains his name choice, citing parody and saying: "By simply choosing the name of a famous artist and using it as his own, he became an artist." The Slovenian Hirst claims that he has been confused online for Damien Hirst. To this we ask, trademark infringement?

    image courtesy of damien hirst

    Turns out, Slovenian Hirst sent an email to White Cube, Damien Hirst’s London gallery, in 2010, seeking approval of his use of Hirst's name. Slovenian DH wrote: “I am not legal professional but I don’t think using a common human name can be a legal offence, especially if you don’t claim to be someone you are not. I just want to know if Damien Hirst would approve of this.” To this, Slovenian Hirst received a reply, which altered him that the name Damien Hirst is trademarked and that neither White Cube nor Hirst approve of his activities.

    The most basic interpretation of the Slovenian Hirst's actions is that he is working under the name of an enormously famous, world-renowned artist. Hirst is one of the wealthiest living artists in the world; he is the wealthiest in the U.K. Another simple interpretation: the Slovenian artist is riding the coat-tails and banking on the confusion of consumers in making his name (no pun intended). He is working within the same field/class of goods as the original Hirst, which is undeniably problematic for trademark purposes. Because it seems that there hasn't been a major lawsuit between the two same-named artists, the Slovenian Hirst's theory of parody has not been put to the test yet. While a court's determination of whether something amounts to a parody is often difficult to predict, I think it is especially trying in this case because we have art on our hands. What do you think?

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    The CFDA Awards are just days away. So, there's no better time than now to meet the nominees. Learn more about the talented designers nominated for this year's CFDA/Swarovski Award for Womenswear: Creatures of the Wind's Shane Gabier and Chris Peters, Cushnie et Ochs' Carly Cushnie and Michelle Ochs, and SUNO's Erin Beatty and Max Osterweis in the video below and in our piece here! 



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    Italian design house, Versace, has prevailed in its four-and-a-half year battle against Griffith Suisse Luxury Group, a Philippines-based company that was selling counterfeit Versace goods online. A Northern California court held on Tuesday that Griffith, which is also involved in a separate lawsuit with eBay, was selling counterfeit goods by way of the online market place, and as a result, the group is now prevented from using Versace’s trademarks, and is indefinitely unable to use eBay as a selling platform. Griffith's sales of counterfeit goods amounts to a violation of eBay policies that is sufficient to establish such suspicion and belief and justify the indefinite suspension and/or termination of its account. Versace chief executive officer Gian Giacomo Ferraris told WWD: “Counterfeit goods not only bring to a dilution of the brand, but are connected to organized crime, child labor and harmful working conditions,” Versace chief executive officer Gian Giacomo Ferraris told WWD. “We are very pleased with the ruling. Versace is a brand that is well known around the world, and the violation of its intellectual property rights is a problem that the company has always been actively fighting. One cannot take pride in being counterfeited.”

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    The Fashion Law Exclusive - Chanel has filed yet another major lawsuit against a group of online retailers selling counterfeit goods. The French design house filed a lawsuit earlier this month in a Miami federal court against over 200 unnamed defendants, and as of Friday, Chanel's legal team has filed suit against an additional 150+ unidentified website owners, including the owners of vipluxuryshop.co.uk, chanel-de.com, net-a-overstock.com, uk-chanel.com, and chanel-japan.info, among others. According to Chanel's complaint, which was filed in the U.S. District Court in the Southern District of Florida, the defendants have used Chanel's name and trademarks "without authorization in order to capitalize on its reputation and goodwill." Chanel's complaint further alleges that the defendants have "illegally infringed and used its registered trademark, in violation of the Lanham Act, causing consumer public confusion, mistake as to the source, affiliation or connection of the defendants' products with [Chanel]." The French design house is asking the court for injunctive relief and damages, as well as attorneys' fees and costs. 

    image courtesy of tfs

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    Parsons the New School For Design introduced another class of graduates this past weekend, and as maybe the most promising design school in the United States, this is sure to be yet another group of promising designers. Known for sculpting some of the most successful names in fashion, the annual Designer of the Year nominees and the winners are ones to keep an eye on. Past winners have included: Marc Jacobs, Proenza Schouler, and Cushnie et Ochs. Other graduates include: Prabal Gurung, Tom Ford, Jason Wu, Peter Som, Alexander Wang, and Derek Lam. Some of this year's nominees answered our questions about their nominations, their brands, what designers they love, and more ... 

    clockwise top left: Renea LaRiviere, Joseph Singh, Maisie Schloss & Soon Il Kwon

    Soon Il Kwon
    Seoul, South Korea-born, Soon Il Kwon studied art for two years in Seoul, then traveled widely, before coming to the United States to pursue his studies in design. His original focus was automotive design, but he eventually found his way to Parsons.



    You were nominated for the Kering Award and for the Parsons' Designer of the Year award. What are your thoughts on these nominations?

    I am really grateful and delighted to be on both Kering and DOY Finalist. Though, I wasn’t quite pleased with myself because I am one of everyone on the lists who are ambitious to be chosen as a winner as well. Right now, I am trying to supplement the faults on this year’s collection to prepare for my next collection; it is definitely going to have more things enhanced to present to the audience.

    I've read all about your collection, but tell me a bit about your design process in general. 

    First, I gather my thoughts and inspirations together visually. Then, I select and extract these visuals to create collages. I usually do drafts of these collages, styling them spontaneously in a concept. For me, there isn’t really a solid method of doing it.

    Do you feel like you're becoming a brand? How are you different from other young designers/design brands?

    Definitely. Studying at Parsons taught me a lot; I learned to control my design ideas and identify what I am better at than other designers. I understand what women want and what they invest their money in - the details that are also creative, luxurious and appealing.

    What is your dream job?

    My dream job in fashion is to launch my own brand. Furthermore, I'd really like to lead a top fashion house, where I can challenge myself with a classic luxury brand that might have different aesthetics than my own and create new looks within their boundaries to attract a new generation of young customers. 

    What fashion designers do you admire/look up to?

    Christophe Lemaire, Phoebe Philo, Riccardo Tisci, Miuccia Prada, Proenza Schouler and many more. I like creative directors/designers who are persistent but at the same time, open to innovation. I admire Thomas Maier’s quality and Dsquared’s wittiness. I am open to all the designers who have their own style and exploring different designers' specialties inspires me.

    What's the first thing you're doing after graduation? 

    My four years at Parsons flew by. I think I am still in developing stage and it maybe too fast to discuss what's next. I just want to explore more about the field I am about to enter.
                                                                                                                                                                

    Joseph Singh
    Joseph Singh was born and raised in San Francisco, California. After attending San Francisco State University, where he majored in biology and San Francisco State University, and San Francisco's Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising, he moved to New York City to further his pursuits in the fashion industry. While attending Parsons, he interned with Donna Karan.


    You were nominated for the Kering Award and for the Parsons' Designer of the Year award. What are your thoughts on these nominations?

    It's been a long and intense journey, which I have enjoyed; it's a great feeling to know that the industry acknowledges my hard work. I am honored to have been nominated for both the Kering and Parsons' Designer of the Year Awards, both of which I did not expect. When the nominations initially came out, I was in shock and at the same time emotionally overwhelmed. I had worked so hard, never anticipating such notoriety, and I just felt truly humbled by these amazing surprises. 

    I've read a bit about your collection, but tell me a bit about your design process in general. 

    During my design process I really wanted the collection to be something personal, something that has a deep meaning behind it. When I initially began, the collection was comprised of basic pleats, which to me didn't mean anything. After a couple of months, I was stuck. I started to research pleats; I wanted to somehow make them different, make them unique. What I did was take the shape of the casket when open, as morbid as that sounds, and applied those shapes to the pleats while still keeping them simple, yet complex at the same time. The leather skirt was the initial piece in the collection, from there I ran with this idea, and the collection was born. It lead to the idea of Dissipation, and letting go. I was letting go of not only my grandfather [who died seven years ago, a man with whom Singh says he "was incredibly close to"] but also of pleating, which is so common in the industry. Letting traditional pleating go. 

    Do you feel like you're becoming a brand? How are you different from other young designers/design brands?

    I do feel like I am becoming a brand, as I have had a lot of success with this collection, namely being featured in the window of Saks, in Style.com and Vogue.com and soon will be on display at Barneys. As a designer, I feel that I am innovative. I am creating something new, something simple yet complex; I like to take traditional materials and methods and evolve them into different things, something that I find challenging. I envision my woman when I am designing - she is constantly evolving. I would love to take the pleating idea further to newer and higher levels. 

    What is your dream job in fashion?

    My dream job in fashion is to design for an established house to hone my skills as a designer and fashion professional while further developing my industry knowledge and skills. Despite internships, my experience has predominantly been classroom-based and I want to learn more about the industry. Also, I want to grow as a professional. I want to design. Looking toward the future, I would love to branch out and open my own brand, Joseph Singh. 

    What fashion designers do you admire/look up to?

    I would LOVE to work at Balenciaga!! I also look up to Proenza Schouler, Alexander Wang, Helmet Lang, and Alexander McQueen, but the list can go on! 

    What's the first thing you're doing after graduation?
    Sleep!! I have been in college for 10 years straight and I want to rest, but only for a couple of days, or else I'll get bored! I'm currently looking for a job, but I have nothing set in stone. I feel that I can't plan everything in life, as much as I try to control opportunities that come my way, I understand that sometimes I need to be flexible and deal with challenges as they arise.


                                                                                                                                                                

    Renea LaRiviere
    While studying at Parsons, Massachusetts-raised Renea LaRiviere interned for Alexander Wan and also worked with Mary Katrantzou. Most recently, LaRiviere worked as a Knitwear Assistant at Diane von Furstenberg. 


    What are your thoughts on the Designer of the Year nomination? 

    I am so flattered to be nominated! One beautiful opportunity was meeting with the boys of Proenza Schouler one on one to introduce them to my collection that they would be viewing on the runway the next day. More importantly though being nominated shows that Parsons is selecting collections that focus more on conceptual development and experimentation. Being nominated this year means crafters do have a voice and are being noticed. 

    I've read all about your collection, but tell me a bit about your design process in general. 

    My process is about the experience of living, the stream of consciousness of the imagination that pours out uncontrollably. All of this chaos consists of what I imagined my ancestors' lives to be, my memories of childhood, and my feelings of living in today’s society. These ideas are then interpreted into a drape, sketch, and fabrication and mashed into an illuminating composition. The final product could very well look like my subconscious went through a washing machine. 

    Do you feel like you're becoming a brand? How are you different from other young designers/design brands?

    I would love to develop what I do into a brand. I feel my approach may be different from the brands that exist because I am choosing to mix and match embellishment, print, construction, and fabric in an approach to find the common thread between them all. My goal is to create a new way to look at the past. The wearer will buy my pieces because she is drawn to the meticulous details, which are so special that she can’t help but treat the garment like a family heirloom. 

    What is your dream job in fashion?

    To work for someone whose designs inspire me. I feel I am incapable of working somewhere where experimentation and creativity is non-existent. When I was at Mary Katranzou, just being able to be surrounded by gorgeous prints and inventing with materials made the time worth while. 

    What fashion designers do you admire/look up to?

    The wild ones. Coco Chanel was able to re-invent a women’s wardrobe, while Cristobal Balenciaga was capable of designing the most simply constructed dress through shape. Their designs were so clever and real. This is a level of sophistication that doesn’t always exist today. 

    What's the first thing you're doing after graduation?

    I am going to spend some time between Northampton, MA where I grew up and Newport, RI to become inspired. Once I return to the city, I plan to continue developing my portfolio and create my own line of one of a kind jackets. 

                                                                                                                                                                

    Maisie SchlossChicago-born Maisie Schloss moved to New York to pursue a career in fashion. Particularly interested in process-based work and textile experimentation, her mixed-media collection references the work of artists Louis Wain and Yayoi Kusama. Schloss interned at Vena Cava and Opening Ceremony during her time at Parsons. 



    What are your thoughts on the Designer of the Year nomination? 

    I was definitely shocked to be nominated, but it's been such an exciting honor. I'm so happy people (judges) responded so positively to the work I dedicated a painstaking year towards. The nomination has also opened many doors for me in terms of exposure, which I am so grateful for. 

    I've read a bit about your collection, but tell me a bit about your design process in general.

    My work is very textile driven, so I begin with tons of fabric treatments. I do a lot of sourcing at places not meant for clothing and then really think about how I can apply these odd materials to my work. I'll do a lot of sketches and plans, but I usually end up using them loosely and just doing what I find works best in the moment. This collection had a pretty crazy process. After working on the collection for eight months with only three weeks until it was due I decided I hated everything and scrapped all of my plans. From then on, I spent day and night throwing together materials and very instinctively creating the second half of the collection. I think this manic shift was what ultimately gave the collection its very unusual and eclectic feeling. 

    Do you feel like you're becoming a brand? How are you different from other young designers/design brands?

    I have always had a really strong understanding of what I do and do not like, and therefore everything I create and have is of a very particular aesthetic. So I guess as an individual you can say I've always been a brand. My work is different from other young designers in that not only do I have a very personal aesthetic that I apply to my work, but my work is also very informed. I have a fine arts background, and I apply theoretical ideas to my work and am constantly thinking about how fashion fits into the overall discourse of art. Recently I've been thinking about designer's loss of control over the context of their clothing, and by creating garments where my process is apparent, the wearer/viewers are prompted to think back to the piece's origins. 

    What is your dream job in fashion?

    I have a lot of those! I have many interests within fashion that I would love to pursue and am excited to see which route I end up on. My many dream jobs for the long run include head designer, buyer for a vintage archive, costume institute curator, and costume designer. As of right now, however, I'm feeling very anxious about finding a job and am truly looking forward to see myself find a position where I can have the work I do actually get produced.

    What fashion designers do you admire/look up to?

    These days I've been really into Nudie Cohn and Tina Knowles. I love the idea of having my work be focused on really elaborate, specialty pieces. I've been working in a vintage archive recently and have a newfound appreciation for old Mugler and Alaia. I also love Rei Kawakubo, Christopher Kane, Hussein Chalayan, Martin Margiela, and Muccia Prada.

    What's the first thing you're doing after graduation? 

    E-mailing my dream employers and filling a few specialty orders. 

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    The tax evasion trial of Dolce & Gabbana founders Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana is coming to a close. Prosecutor Gaetano Ruta made his closing speech in a Milan courthouse today, setting out his punishment proposal. He told that court that Domenico Dolce, Stefano Gabbana and board member Cristiana Ruella should be sentenced to two-and-a-half years in prison; Alfonso Dolce, Domenico's brother, and finance director Giuseppe Minoni be sentenced to two years in prison; and that the desighners' accountant, Luciano Patelli, should serve three years in prison. The case stems from the sale of the Dolce & Gabbana brand in 2004, and the founders' alleged failure to pay about $540 million in related taxes. More to come ...

    image courtesy of tfs

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    The Fashion Law Exclusive - NYC-based jewelry designer and nominee for this year's CFDA x Swarovski Award for emerging jewelry design, Pamela Love, filed a lawsuit in the Southern District of New York on Friday. The young designer named Opera Accessories, Judy's Accessories, and Paul Han as defendants in the copyright infringement suit. In her complaint, Love claims that the defendants, which are wholesale jewelry websites and its owner/operator, infringed her copyrighted Talon Cuff (pictured below) by "advertising, manufacturing and selling cheap knockoff reproductions" of the design. The 2011 CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund runner up, who launched her brand in 2006, is asking for upwards on $150,000 in damages, as well as injunctive relief and attorney's fees. The bracelet has been spotted on street style icons and industry insiders like Julia Restoin Roitfeld, Giovanna Battaglia, Mary-Kate Olsen, and Love, herself, among others. Love brought suit against ANA Accessories Corporation last month and against Urban Outfitters last year, both for copyright infringement. 

    image courtesy of cool spotters

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    Another day, another Hermès, LVMH development. The two luxury giants have been in a bitter battle for years, with Hermès fighting LVMH ownership, and as of this past year, the two are involved in rival lawsuits. The latest development stems from an investigation by the French stock market, following Hermès’ lawsuit, which alleges that LVMH is responsible for insider trading, collusion and manipulating stock prices in conjunction with its acquired stake in Hermès, a largely family-owned company. LVMH chairman Bernard Arnault spoke out in April saying that the luxury conglomerate’s 22.6 percent stake in Hermes had come as a surprise to him. However, as of last week, the French stock market authority announced that it found that LVMH had secretly bought shares in rival Hermès to build a stake in the iconic Paris-based design house, and not merely to make a financial investment as LVMH has claimed.


    In October 2010, LVMH announced (to much surprise) that it had "amassed a 17.1 percent stake in Hermès via cash-settled equity swaps that allowed it to circumvent the usual regulations requiring firms to declare share purchases." In France, companies are required to disclose when they take a stake worth more than five percent of another company's capital if the target is listed on the stock market. LVMH claims they will fight the stock market authority’s claims on May 31st, when the parties meet with the sanctions committee. After this hearing, the stock market watchdog will announce whether or not it will level sanctions against LVMH.

    In response to Hermès' suit, LVMH, filed suit against Hermès for slander, blackmail and unfair competition.

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    image courtesy of tfs

    While Abercrombie and Fitch's CEO, Mike Jeffries, has been creating one PR crisis after the next (think: his statement that the brand targets "cool, good-looking people" and not women that wear size 10 or larger), Abercrombie's legal team is cracking down on the sale of counterfeit goods. Thanks to years of financial hardship in the U.S., counterfeiters are not longer targeting high end fashion exclusively. In fact, middle of the road brands like Abercrombie, Victoria's Secret, and the Gap are being illegally replicated with an increased frequency. Websites like wholesalebrandclothes.com, abercrombiefitchsupply.com, and 7abercrombie.com, are passing off a wide selection  of fake Abercrombie garments as authentic wares for a fraction of the price, and are likely confusing consumers in the process. As a result, Abercrombie's counsel has filed suit in the U.S. District Court in the Southern District of Florida last week against one hundred different websites that they are alleging have sold t-shirts, shorts, pants, jackets, coats, bikinis, and other garments bearing imitations of Abercrombie and Fitch's trademarks. The Ohio-based company is asking the court to seize the domains at issue, in addition to a monetary award of upwards of $100,000 in damages plus interest and other fees and costs. 

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    Joseph A Bank, the venerable men’s retailer best known for aggressively chasing the “bottom of the white collar food-chain” demographic, find themselves in court once again for their allegedly deceptive advertising practices.  While most people won’t deny the (alleged) value of buying one of their sack suits, rayon ties, or allegedly cotton dress shirts and receiving 8 free, not everyone can be expected to be as grateful.

    not a suit from Jos A. Bank

    Last week, John E. Schneider filed a class action suit against Jos A. Bank Clothiers in the U.S. District Court in the Northern District of Ohio. While the complaint has just been filed, the suit is nearly identical to the one filed against the zero-time CFDA award-winning retailer last year in New Jersey. Like the case at hand, the New Jersey case sought class action status and centered on the advertising practices of Jos A. Bank, whereby their clothing is always on sale and (maybe) never actually sold at regular price.  This deceptive behavior has supposedly defrauded consumers into purchasing Jos A. Bank’s wares when, had they known that the “sale” price was not actually a sale at all, they otherwise would not have.

    Also worth noting, Kohl’s finds itself in similar waters as a class action lawsuit has just been filed against it in California for its nearly identical advertising practices. With New Jersey having dismissed the first Jos A. Bank suit, it will come down to Ohio and California to determine the future of discount retailer advertising. It certainly is an interesting time to be a discount retailer right now! (And when was the last time you heard that??)

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    It seems that singer Frank Ocean isn't being let off easily from claims of fraud, copyright infringement and breach of contract, according to a ruling from a U.S. District Court judge in Los Angeles. Riccardo Tisci's rumored boyfriend has been named in producer Micah Otano's lawsuit, along with UMG Recordings and Universal Music Group, among others, in which he is claiming that Ocean is using a song they made together and passing it off as his own. This week, U.S. District Judge Ronald Lew refused to toss the contract and fraud claims in the suit, finding that whether the parties had a valid oral agreement could not be decided at this stage of the litigation. 

    Ocean at the Brit Awards in Givenchy - image courtesy of nme

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    The Fashion Law Exclusive - Last summer, we told you exclusively that Yves Saint Laurent had taken its first steps in rebranding as Saint Laurent with the signage at its Soho store, and now we have another bit of news. In addition to a shop on Mercer Street in Soho, it appears that Hedi Slimane's Saint Laurent may be getting set to launch in the Chelsea neighborhood of New York, as well. Just a block away from Chelsea Piers on 22nd Street between 10th and 11th Avenues, the space, which is currently under construction, is covered in images from Saint Laurent's Pre-Fall 2013 collection. If its true, the Saint Laurent store will join Balenciaga and Comme des Garçons on this block.

    According to a TFL source, Saint Laurent is set to open a flagship at this location in Chelsea, with a slated debut date of mid-October.


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    Fresh off a cocaine scandal, model Cara Delevingne is the perfect face of Saint Laurent's Fall 2013 campaign, the much talked about collection of grunge looks. The Paris-based design house has released Part I of its campaign, which includes a video starring Delevingne and DIIV frontman Zachary Cole Smith. Stay tuned for Part II - its set to debut in mid-June. See more shots of Delevingne below and the full video ... 




    images courtesy of style.com

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    Beyonce may love the Stuart Weitzman, brand but it seems one former employee does not. The footwear designer and its parent company, the Jones Group, are heading to court after a former employee filed suit on Thursday. Gina Nigido, who worked at Stuart Weitzman's headquarters in NYC for nearly eight years as an account executive, is suing the companies for failure to pay overtime wages. Nigido filed suit in the Southern District of New York and is asking for liquidated, compensatory and punitive damages (punitive damages may be awarded in addition to actual damages when the defendant acted intentionally maliciously or with utter disregard for the plaintiff). She's also asking for interest and attorney's fees. 


    image courtesy of vogue.it

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